Refocus your energy!

downloadOne of the themes that emerging from my client conversations lately is the need to refocus. What do you do when you or your organization experiences gridlock and a lack of energy? Or when increased activities just don't result in the desired ends? Being gridlocked shows up in three ways: (1) an unending treadmill of trying harder, (2) looking for answers rather than re-framing questions, and (3) either/and or thinking that creates false dichotomies.
Sometimes a leader just needs to stop and refocus. The pressures of the daily grind and challenges that constantly jump in the way of progress have a tendency of dulling clarity and shifting actions to activities that have no direct impact on results. Take several steps to refocus your efforts and the work of your team.
First, identify the questions that are nagging at the back of your head. This requires some honest reflection - identify the "self-talk" that develops just behind your conscious mind. One client paused for a moment and said, "Oh, I get it." Then he began to list his nagging questions,"Am I making a difference? Is this really worth it? Is this what I really want to do? Why have I failed in every major endeavor?" He paused, "This is tiring, I'm exhausted just saying these things."
I sat on the phone quietly for a moment then responded, "Didn't you start this conversation by saying you were exhausted and lacked energy?"
"Yes," he said.
He had been working harder, looking for solutions and all he really accomplished was reducing his field of vision to false dichotomies e.g., his team was either loyal or disloyal, customers were either about to leave or diminish their orders, his spouse was either supportive or undermining his success. He identified the nagging questions, now he was ready for the next step. "Let's re-frame the questions," I said.
Second, re-frame the questions that had been nagging you at the back of your mind. The client above re-framed each of his questions in the following way: "In what ways do I make a difference? In what ways is this worth the effort or in what ways can my efforts be better directed? In what ways does the present contribute to my ultimate contribution in life?" (He had done the work previously of identifying what he wanted his ultimate contribution to be.) "In what ways have past failures positioned me for success in the present?"
As he re-framed the questions the cadence of his speech increased, his tone sounded more optimistic, and his thoughts became more prolific - less ponderous. The more he worked to re-frame the questions the more energy came over the phone and the more creative his brainstorming became.
Third, go back to your personal mission statement. If you don't have a personal mission statement its a good idea to build one. It helps to focus attention on activity that contributes to the right end rather than getting caught in the treadmill of activity seeking to convince yourself that you are legitimate. When I suggested this my client just sighed. "I think," he said, "I lost track of my purpose somewhere in the midst of this year's challenges." He restated his purpose and immediately determined to drop three initiatives that had no bearing on what he really wanted to accomplish.
Each of these steps can help pull a leader out of gridlock and back into being a contributor to a measurable purpose.
Use the same steps to turn your team around. Brainstorm with them to identify the questions nagging their performance and identity. Re-frame those questions together and watch new alternatives and new ideas begin to accelerate. Return to the mission of the organization and review the activities people are engaged in - stop and redirect activities that have no bearing on producing the value associated with your organizational mission.
Everyone loses focus at some point. Don't let the nagging questions become the pimp of your talent selling your best energy to actions that have no return and no promise. One of my students in Kenya responded to these principles in a lecture by saying, "You metaphorically ask me to eat and elephant. Do you know how to eat an elephant Dr. Wheeler?" he paused with a twinkle in his eye. Then after the appropriate pregnant hesitation, he continued, "One bite at a time!"  So, go ahead face your elephant and start eating!